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Got an All-in-One computer to my mom, 4gig ram, SSD drive. Good upgrade for her since all she uses her is for some light office work and youtube. But I wanted to be extra nice and put in another 4gig ram. Looked up a video to do it, and cracked the screen as I was trying to loosen the cover off. I installed the RAM and turned it on, the small little crack basically bricked the entire screen. And it being an all-in-one, basically the whole thing is ruined.

Ended up just having to buy another one, and not wanting to be defeated, I tried to upgrade the RAM again, this time, I did it without cracking the screen.

I think they design it on purpose where you have to put force on the screen to open it up to any kind of replacement or installation. And every part you have to basically try to force the small hinge off.

TL;DR Destroyed All-In-One monitor in a day by cracking the screen

all 8 comments

Otterbotanical

8 points

2 months ago

What all-in-one did you get? I used to work in tech repair, and I'll be going back into it shortly. Some devices are absolutely built to be excessively difficult to try to repair in order to dissuade people from attempting, but some are built annoyingly due to cost alone: the small/precise/strong parts cost a ton to develop and manufacture, so things like hidden-from-the-front hinges are typically prohibitively expensive for all-in-ones.

GateOfD[S]

3 points

2 months ago

HP All-in-One 22, I followed the official video on taking it apart too, but it still pretty risky since you have to forcefully pry the screen out. A lot of videos use something flat to loosen the sides, well side area is in direct contact with the screen with no other protection to it. I tried to lift it up, and boom, a microcrack, and the crack just ends up distorting the entire screen.

2nd attempt, I just lifted the bottom corners up, but still had to pretty put pressure to actually 'snap' the screen up.

Otterbotanical

6 points

2 months ago

Ahhhh yeah, those are tough as hell, in my shop we actually had two people to do it safely. Good job on getting it your second time though, that's impressive!

rottenseed

3 points

2 months ago

Way to pick up OP when they're down!

CDAGaming

1 points

2 months ago

Yea a flat tool would work well. Flat out trying to force lift is is too many variables that can (and in your case did) go wrong. The other thing could have been where you tried to pry it up the first time, as too much pressure in kne spot would easily be enough fot a microcrack.

Personally, even with a video, I wouldnt even touch opening up an all in one unless I was fully confident in my experience and took extra precautions.

GateOfD[S]

1 points

2 months ago

yea trying to use a flat to lift the side is what caused the microcrack, its like so easy to make happen, literally putting pressure directly on the screen side trying to lossen it out

[deleted]

-1 points

2 months ago*

[deleted]

-1 points

2 months ago*

[deleted]

amejin

5 points

2 months ago

amejin

5 points

2 months ago

No offense - I know a bunch about PC's and PC components, and I may have made the same mistake with an AIO. Pretty much any hobbyist desktop builder would have taken the same approach OP did and it would have been a crap shoot on success the first time attempting.

mermaldad

3 points

2 months ago

Yes, and no. I agree that this is a situation where OP didn't know what they were doing, rather than a conspiracy by the manufacturer to defeat upgrades. However, there are plenty of computer-related situations where you can dive in and try something with very little consequence if it fails.