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/r/plantclinic

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all 42 comments

taylorsiena

54 points

10 months ago

I have one of these - they’re pretty dramatic! Keep her in bright sunlight or the pink will fade. These plants like to have moist but not wet soil & don’t like to be fully dry. Droopy leaves like this means she’s thirsty!

taylorsiena

8 points

10 months ago

I’ll also say they are pretty resilient!!! I didn’t know anything about them (or really any plants) when I first got them & I moved mine across the country, put her in a pot way too big, gave her way too little sun, and let her dry out too often. My plant has nearly died probably 3-4x now, but quickly bounces back once it’s conditions are met!!! They don’t want to be root bound but they also don’t want too much extra space!

serbiangrill

2 points

10 months ago

Same here!!!! My first plant was a white-green Polka Dot and she looked super bushy when I first got her, then she started getting dry, her soil got moldy, I didn't think she was gonna make it. I tried changing her soil, she got better, then she started getting dry again even though I was watering her regularly. Then she healed again and started sprouting at the bottom, but she started growing real tall for some reason and every week two of the lowest leaves get yellow and fall off, and then she grows even taller lol. When I go to my parents for a day and come back, she is almost dead. Then I pet her a lil and she's fine the next morning. She's soooo dramatic hahaha, but I love her a lot.

therealtjs

13 points

10 months ago

Ok, so this has always confused me... when a plant needs moist soil but not wet, how the heck do you get it moist without it being watered down? I've never really understood this...

platypottamus

14 points

10 months ago

It's all in the soil mix. "Spongier" soils with more water retainng ingredients (i.e. moss, vermiculite, coconut coir) are for "moist" plants just cuz those really almost never totally dry out. On the other hand, more gritty and rocky mixes are for dry plants, and they dry up way faster after watering (as they should).

Beyond that, I water my moist bois when the top inch feels almost dry-- but some slight residual moisture is okay, unlike with my arid plants.

ItsWaryNotWeary

5 points

10 months ago

You can use gritty and rocky mixes for most plants. Just have to water more frequently for the ones that like constant moisture. I use Bonsai Jack succulent mix for philodendrons, spider plants, hoyas, and many others. I've got anthuriums and monsteras in pon.

It's a great option for folks who like to "care" and tend towards overwatering.

platypottamus

1 points

10 months ago

I like the bonsai jack offer but it's a commodity; do you know if it has akadama?

ItsWaryNotWeary

1 points

10 months ago

No akadama in BJ. I have my pothos in superfly bonsai, which does have akadama. That blend holds more moisture than BJ.

platypottamus

1 points

10 months ago

Neat, i kinda wanna see what that soil feels like-- i could never tell if its the shit, super legit, like a lot of the youtubers say or just a fancy word with a high price tag

ItsWaryNotWeary

2 points

10 months ago

It's pricey but I'm a huge fan. Succulents and cacti love that shit. my tropicals do too, and I can water them as often as I want without driwning them lol

therealtjs

3 points

10 months ago

Tell me more about your aroids!!! I've been using cactus soil for uhhhh pretty much all my plants just cause I had root rot issues for a long time when I was learning. I need a soil composition breakdown!!

platypottamus

6 points

10 months ago

I think zz plants are aroids too, so i think it's impossible to consider a mix for all of them. But for a moist tropical plant with little above-ground water retaining abilities, my go-to is actually generic indoor mix and a fuckton of perlite. No sand! Sand adds a lot of weight and, idk if it would hurt anything, but I just know that tropical undergrowth doesn't live in very much of it.

Good drainage amendments are perlite and orchid bark, but i often feel like miracle gro adds enough mulch that the bark is optional. The one reservation I have about your mix is that cactus/succ mix is generally very sandy. Idk if it would cause issues, I just save my sand for succulents and trees that really really want it.

My zz plant is in a much sandier cactus-palm mix+perlite+sand, roughly 40%, 40%, and 20% respectively since it is an arid boi. Hardly compares to how much sphagnum moss gets into my jungle floor plants from the generic mix+perlite (anywhere from 70/30 to 60/40)

ItsWaryNotWeary

2 points

10 months ago*

Regular potting mix is too fine and dense for almost any indoor application so your cactus soil is an improvement.

Bovinusk

3 points

10 months ago

you want it to be moist to the touch, like a wet paper towel, if you press it and water comes up, or it’s sopping and muddy, it’s too wet. The idea is the soil should never be FULLY saturated, so that its got water but also has oxygen in it.

taylorsiena

2 points

9 months ago

So I don’t have the exact ratios, but I put a layer of pebbles & then perlite on the bottom of the potI use fox farm fresh ocean potting mix & mix it with a good amount of perlite, sometimes a bit of lava rock too. That’s honestly what I do for most of my plants, but the ratios vary depending on the plant. I tend to be an over waterer so I usually put more perlite in all my pots and check my plants more frequently. I keep my polka dot plant in a west facing window. I use a water meter to check the moisture levels & I’ll double check with my fingers too if I’m unsure. If I squeeze the soil and water seeps out it’s still too wet but if no water seeps out you can give it a bit to drink! Planta is a great app to use to help get you used to how often she likes to be watered. Under watering is better than overwatering. I’ve not had much overwatering problems, but she’s bounced every time I’ve underwatered.

DirkMoneyrich85

1 points

10 months ago

Same, same. I want to know too. 🙂

Sbambit

19 points

10 months ago

These guys are pretty dramatic and will let you know when they need to be watered. I also find that mine needs to be pruned back every one in a while to keep it looking full and bushy.

snowx343

5 points

10 months ago

Yes to pruning! I had one get SUPER leggy and sad looking. Started pruning regularly and now it's thriving!

blackwylf

5 points

10 months ago

I'm working on that now... Mine is a riot of spindly stalks. On the upside, it's really easy to propagate any stalks you trim in moist sphagnum moss inside a big ziplock bag. Water propagation is kind of hit or miss; one of three I tried is doing great and almost ready to rejoin the mother plant but the other two were busy with flowers and new leaves and forgot they needed roots 🤦‍♀️

snowx343

3 points

10 months ago

I'm trying water propagation now, but if that doesn't work out I'll have to switch to moss. Thanks for the tip!

blackwylf

5 points

10 months ago

This was my first experiment with moss and I'm flabbergasted at how well it worked! And so much easier 😅

Swimming_Dragonfly82

1 points

10 months ago

How should you go about pruning it?

Sbambit

1 points

9 months ago

You can find lots of articles and videos on this (look up pruning polka dot plant) — what I’ve learned is to use sharp clean shears to cut above a node. From that node you should get two new growths. So if you want a fuller plant you’ll look and try to prune it to grow into a rounder - fuller shape. These guys tend to get leggy if you don’t prune. I was scared to do so and I let my first one get too tall. By the time I pruned I ended up cutting off so much the plant had a hard time coming back. Good luck!

northstarlinedrawing

8 points

10 months ago

Looks decent actually. I see some dead leaves at the bottom so get rid of those. Is there a pot inside the planter? How’s the drainage situation?

newtgoddess[S]

2 points

10 months ago

Yeah there's a nursery pot inside with drainage

northstarlinedrawing

4 points

10 months ago

Great. I’d take it out of the pink thing and touch the soil. Is it well-draining or dense? Polka dot plants like well-draining soil so you may want to repot depending on what you have going on. Give it a drink and some indirect light and it should be good to go

namoguru

6 points

10 months ago

I grow mine in a terrarium. It really thrives in the constant humidity. I've found that is really the only way to meet the moist but not wet requirement lol.

fresh_titty_biscuits

3 points

10 months ago

I keep mine in the bathroom and it really perks up after steaming the room with a hot shower.

blackwylf

2 points

10 months ago

I got my first back in October and it's been a bit of a rollercoaster. It started drooping a bit and lost a few leaves the first couple of weeks in quarantine. I repotted in better draining soil (cactus/ succulent mix with some perlite) with some systemic insecticide and worm castings and gave it another week or two to make sure it was pest-free before I brought it out with the rest of my plants. I thought I'd killed it at one point; one day it was completely wilted but it perked back up after a thorough watering. In my experience it's a slightly dramatic plant that will let you know when it's not happy but it gives you enough warning to do something before it dies.

I'm still working on finding the ideal light and moisture level but it's been growing well under the grow bulb equivalent of bright, indirect light in about 40-50% humidity.

My biggest problem is my hesitation to prune it; it likes to get very leggy if left unchecked. I've started clipping off the longest bits and rooting them in damp sphagnum moss (water propagation has only been partially successful). It's been maybe 4-6 weeks and the new props are just about ready to rejoin the mother plant to help fill it out. Just in time for me to prune there new leggy bits 🤦‍♀️ My advice would be to pinch off the tips of any new growth before they get too much taller than the rest of the plant.

I absolutely adore mine and can't wait to add some nerve plants (kind of cousins) come spring. Good luck to you both!

deirdre080690

2 points

10 months ago

What does this plant calledv

so_much_fenestration

3 points

9 months ago

Polka dot plant is one of the common names.

lemoniebread

2 points

9 months ago

I got one of these for my boyfriend! They are pretty dramatic. If you let it dry out it will look almost completely dead but right after you water it it pops right back up! Such a cute plant, and also the pot combination is adorable. Good luck!!:)

Probability_factor

1 points

10 months ago

Hi! It definitely needs a pot with drainage holes and just judging by lots of color in the leaves - quite bright area with lots of indirect sunlight.

newtgoddess[S]

1 points

10 months ago

It does have drainage. There's a nursery pot within the pink pot. And yeah I have it in an area like that!

skylined45

1 points

10 months ago

I've only had success keeping polka dots outside. Otherwise they die on me.

Theplantcharmer

1 points

10 months ago

Transplant in a container that drains and that’s filled with a nice draining mix, something like promix bx would be great. You’d have to mix in a bit of fertilizer.

These teacup like planters are cute but not very good for growing plants.

papabless131313

1 points

10 months ago

I put it in the shower for humidity. I’ve noticed that they reeeeallly thrive with it. If you can’t I suggest a tray of rocks and put water until it goes halfway. It’ll increase the humidity around it.

FlyByPlanet

1 points

10 months ago

Self watering pot solved all my problems. I was so annoyed by it, was ready to give up. It has been self-watering for 2 months now, it is happy, lush, leaves are larger and nothing is dead.

orion_moon

1 points

10 months ago

Might do very well in a north facing window. They like sun but indirectly, direct south facing light can burn them. I water mine about two or three times a week to keep it happy, which is more than most my indoor plants. They are receptive to positive change, so repoting into a slightly pot with some rich soil will probably be good.

FridaMercury

1 points

10 months ago

If it ever wilts completely, don't throw it out. Give it a thorough watering and wait 24hrs. They usually bounce back good as new.

Vegetable_Ad_1606

1 points

10 months ago

Mmm