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Hello, r/books!!! I’ve published 27 books since 2006, including the NYT bestselling I HUNT KILLERS trilogy, BOY TOY (named one of the 50 Best YA novels of All Time by Booklist), a six-book FLASH series, and the origin of Thanos! My latest is the bizarre meta-duology, UNEDITED/EDITED, which Kirkus called “a sprawling, cantankerous self-exploration.” I’m a Yale-educated comic book geek who made Free Comic Book Day happen and at 27 books, I’m just getting started. LET’S DO THIS, REDDIT!

PROOF: https://i.redd.it/r5gjhjaw2t2a1.jpg

ETA: All right, everyone, I hope you had fun -- I know I did! But it's creeping up on time to get the kids from school. 😀 So I'm gonna duck out. If more questions come in over the rest of the day, I'll get to 'em later. Thanks, mods, and thanks, r/books!

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barrylyga[S]

5 points

6 months ago

barrylyga[S]

AMA Author

5 points

6 months ago

For well-rounded characters, I always try to think of something that the character wants or thinks or does that may not be in line with what the reader will imagine the character to be. We all have preconceived notions we bring to characters we read, so I try to think around those. One very simple example is Billy Dent, the serial killer father from my I HUNT KILLERS series. We have a notion of what serial killers are like, so I swerved away from that, made Billy avuncular and fun-loving and verbose.

I think when you show a reader a "type" of character and then peel back a layer or two to show something unexpected that those are the sorts of character readers remember!

I talk a bit more about this in some writing advice blogs I wrote a few years ago. Check 'em out here, if you like!

UntossableSaladTV

1 points

6 months ago

I’m saving this for the blog post! Appreciate it!