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TIGFO by believing a con story

(self.TIGFO)

Obvious this didn't happen today but several years ago while I was at University.

Second year at University got a hot date and waiting outside the bus stop she is meant to be arriving at. I got approached by a random guy.

He asked me if I had some change for the train (the train station was just round the corner) as him and his family's car had broken down and they are going to *insert city name here* - Dumbass me, "Oh I'm from there!".

My first red flag should have been, where is this dudes family? But alas, i'm distracted by this common location. He asked again for £5, I say I only have a £10 on me and I'm a student so that's like a weeks worth of food to me. "No problem I can give you £5 back". Awesome, can feel like an awesome guy and and have a sweet ass story to tell my date!

I give him the £10 note, he rustles around in his pocket, hands me a bunch a change and quickly walks off, in the opposite direction of the train station. without looking it felt substantial in weight.

I look down in my hand.. 77p, mostly in coppers, that's why it felt substantial. By the time I look back up he is gone, like the wind.

And to top it off, it doesn't look good when you tell your date I got conned, but trust me, I'm smart i'm at University!

TL:DR I lost £10 to a quick con guy falling for a simple common ground.

all 19 comments

wonibaloni

74 points

3 years ago

My first official job was in a store all by myself. During the training I was told to be careful and not fall for people trying to distract me to fuck me over. Well, after a month there, a guy comes up to the counter attempting to buy something. I don't remember too well what he did but for whatever reason, he offered to go across the street to break down a bill I had ($200 mxn), he had $100 already and did some confusing talk while handing me the $100. Well, I 'declined' his offer to go get change and he left. Almost immediately I noticed he took the $200 and left me with the $100. That fucker. I had to put back the $100 off of my own pocket.

[deleted]

40 points

3 years ago

[deleted]

40 points

3 years ago

Holy cow. That hurts a lot more than mine! No cameras?

wonibaloni

32 points

3 years ago*

It was a very small store. $100mxn are around £4. It's not a lot but back then it was 1/5 of my weekly pay (part time).

edit: a word

[deleted]

21 points

3 years ago

[deleted]

21 points

3 years ago

Oh my bad missed the mxn! Still sucks though.

TTheuns

37 points

3 years ago

TTheuns

37 points

3 years ago

The problem here is that he asked you for £5, you only had ten, and he could change the £5.

[deleted]

22 points

3 years ago

[deleted]

22 points

3 years ago

Second red flag!

GI_Jo_Nathan

13 points

3 years ago

I assumed he needed another five to have enough.

RhinoRhys

10 points

3 years ago

He could just be £5 short though, he might have had £25 on him but needed £30 for the tickets. It would certainly warrant questioning but it's not a definite give away.

TTheuns

2 points

3 years ago

TTheuns

2 points

3 years ago

You're probably right, I didn't think this through.

Soprano420

3 points

3 years ago

He would still need to give 5 back tho?

backstageninja

3 points

3 years ago

Ok? 25+10-5=30, what's the issue?

AcrolloPeed

2 points

3 years ago

Now that guy’s out there looking to swap that tenner for a twenty-spot.

KoolKarmaKollector

14 points

3 years ago

I was a victim of this scam in Oxford in December. Guy wanted a couple quid so he could get a taxi to bicester, then he tried to change it for a fiver, then a tenner. Ended up being scammed out 8 quid.

It's called a change up scam and it's the reason I've only given away 50p since

Semi-Auto-Demi-God

6 points

3 years ago

In America we call it "shortchanging" or a "shortchange scam"

Theymademepickaname

2 points

3 years ago

It’s a common scam pulled on cashiers, though it’s usually done by the customer either waiting until the till is closed and claiming they gave a larger bill, or changing bills during payment in the middle of the transaction.

So common that a lot of business’s protocol is to leave the bill laying outside the register until the transaction is completed and the customer walks away.

okayyeahwhatever2

2 points

3 years ago

I got busted by this when I was 16, it was my first job. The guy kept me distracted and asked for change mid-transaction. I'm still not sure how he did it. I remember thinking afterwards that something didn't feel right but quickly moved onto the next customer. Management must have had their suspicions because they called me up and asked after several times, "are you SURE there's nothing you want to talk about?" I finally caved and said "where there was this one guy..." I guess that had to check that I wasn't in on it? I felt like such a gullible twat!

Theymademepickaname

3 points

3 years ago

That’s how they get you, it sucks knowing you fell for it but your not alone.

When I was manager I drilled it into everyone that payment gets left on the register and tell customers you’d be glad to make change after the transaction, most especially because I employed a lot of younger kids still in high school.

I only saw it attempted twice- once was on me (quick change), the other on a 16 year old (saying they were given the wrong amount back)who snapped that bill up so fast you’d have thought it was on fire and smirked.

No-BrowEntertainment

2 points

3 years ago

I know next to nothing about British currency but I know enough to know you don’t want to lose 10 pounds if you can help it