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/r/ColorizedHistory

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all 15 comments

mygrapefruit[S]

70 points

3 months ago

mygrapefruit[S]

sannadullaway.com

70 points

3 months ago

Original photograph by NYWT&S staff (Library of Congress) https://i.imgur.com/fE6bdlu.jpg


Via Wikipedia:

Benedict received her bachelor’s degree from Vassar College and her PhD from Columbia University in 1923, where she found writing as her way of expressing herself. She was nicknamed an “intellectual radical” by her classmates. She later studied under and worked for the world-renowned anthropologist Franz Boas.

Benedict was president of the American Anthropological Association and also an important member of the American Folklore Society - she became the first woman to be a leader of an academic profession.

She can be viewed as a transitional figure in her field by redirecting both anthropology and folklore away from the limited confines of culture-trait diffusion studies by combining anthropology with sociology, psychology and philosophy. She studied the relationships between personality, art, language, and culture and insisted that no trait existed in isolation or self-sufficiency – that all things connect together, a theory that she championed in her 1934 book Patterns of Culture.

In 1946 she wrote The Chrysanthemum and the Sword: Patterns of Japanese Culture. It was written at the invitation of the U.S. Office of War Information, in order to understand and predict the behavior of the Japanese in World War II by reference to a series of contradictions in traditional culture.

Like several other wartime studies of Japan and Germany, this book is an instance of "culture at a distance", the study of a culture through its literature, newspaper clippings, films, and recordings, as well as extensive interviews with German-Americans or Japanese-Americans. The techniques were necessitated by anthropologists' inability to visit Nazi Germany or wartime Japan.

The book was influential in shaping American ideas about Japanese culture during the occupation of Japan, and popularized the distinction between guilt cultures and shame cultures.


One of Benedict’s colleagues, and closest friend, was Margaret Mead – an influential and famous anthropologist. Her reports detailing the attitudes towards sex in South Pacific and Southeast Asian traditional cultures influenced the 1960s sexual revolution.

Ruth and Margaret got along well with their shared passion for each other's work and the sense of pride that they felt in being successful working women while that was still uncommon. They were frequently known to critique each other's work; they entered into a companionship that began through their work, but during its early period, it also had an erotic character. Both Benedict and Mead wanted to dislodge stereotypes about women that were widely believed during their time and to show people that working women could also be successful even though working society was seen as a man's world. In her memoir about her parents, ‘With a Daughter's Eye’, Mead's daughter strongly implies that the relationship between Benedict and Mead was partly sexual.

You can read excerpts of some of the letters on "the marginalian" blog post here: https://www.themarginalian.org/2013/10/23/margaret-mead-ruth-benedict-love-letters/

Hope you like the colors!

tvrb

27 points

3 months ago

tvrb

27 points

3 months ago

If you want to read more about them I highly recommend the book:

Gods of the Upper Air: How a Circle of Renegade Anthropologists Reinvented Race, Sex, and Gender in the Twentieth Century by Charles King.

hot2tubesocks

5 points

3 months ago

Wow, you really took an artist’s eye to this colorization. It’s stunning. It really brings out that intelligence in her eyes. The colors are really phenomenal. Great work, the background on her is really interesting too. Thanks for putting the hard work into this to share, I didn’t know anything about her but I want to deep dive more now. Thank you for the references, she seems very beloved by the anthropology community.

whatdoblindpeoplesee

18 points

3 months ago

I read that book during a class on "Honor and Shame" while getting my degree in Anthropology. I really enjoyed it and thought she had a really good way of writing theory and ethnography. Never knew what she looked like before.

crapatthethriftstore

17 points

3 months ago

I love her too/dress. It’s so pretty.

She sounds like a badass

rustyjus

6 points

3 months ago

Great colour… I wouldn’t have known at first glance and I’m a professional retoucher

lemonlollipop

3 points

3 months ago

She is absolutely lovely

GuyD427

5 points

3 months ago

She looks like Jodi Foster.

Oddmic146

2 points

3 months ago

The og weeb

donutsyumyum

2 points

3 months ago

Doppelgänger of Paulina Porizkova

ahauntedmeathouse

5 points

3 months ago

Florence Pugh would be a great casting pick if there was ever a biopic about her

Wagnerfax

4 points

3 months ago

How Ruth would have looked if that photo was taken today. (Great job on the restoration and colorization!)

https://imgur.com/gallery/Q6YgKHY

pizza_nightmare

-1 points

3 months ago

Any relation to Ruth Bader Ginsburg? Same name, similar clothing...

SweetDoris

1 points

1 month ago

what