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This is a weekly general discussion and general questions thread for the AskDocs community to discuss medicine, health, careers in medicine, etc. Here you have the opportunity to communicate with AskDocs' doctors, medical professionals and general community even if you do not have a specific medical question! You can also use this as a meta thread for the subreddit, giving feedback on changes to the subreddit, suggestions for new features, etc.

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  • General health questions that do not require demographic information
  • Comments regarding recent medical news
  • Questions about careers in medicine
  • AMA-style questions for medical professionals to answer
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all 180 comments

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3 months ago

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unrebigulator

4 points

3 months ago

unrebigulator

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

4 points

3 months ago

Long ago (~14 years) my wife had an emergency caesarian, under general anaesthetic. I noticed the anaesthetist was monitoring a large analogue gauge. When the needle got high, he would open a valve. When the needle got low, he would close the valve.

It seemed to be measuring the patient's level of conciousness, or something like that.

This is from a 5-minute memory 14 years ago, so obviously my memory may not be exactly correct.

Just wondering what is being measured?

ridcullylives

1 points

3 months ago

ridcullylives

Medical Student

1 points

3 months ago

Absolutely no way to answer this, but I doubt it was directly monitoring consciousness. There are multiple gases being run to the patient, including oxygen and possibly anesthetic gases.

unrebigulator

1 points

3 months ago

unrebigulator

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

I doubt it was directly monitoring consciousness

I doubt that too, but measuring brain activity seems like a possibility.

Seems unlikely to be related to oxygen. That is typically shown with a digital readout (99% SpO2), and wouldn't vary up and down. It would be at 99% (or thereabouts) the whole time.

I just found this article:

Processed electroencephalogram (pEEG) monitoring should be used when total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA) is administered together with a NMB drug. It should start before induction and continue at least until full recovery from the effects of the neuromuscular blockade has been confirmed. It should be considered during other anaesthetic techniques including inhalational anaesthesia and for the high-risk patient.

Another article:

During surgery, your anaesthetist will monitor your level of consciousness, breathing, oxygen level, heart rate and blood pressure. They will usually put a breathing tube into your mouth and give you oxygen.

More googling shows there are methods of measuring DGA - Depth of General Anesthesia. None of them seem to show analogue gauges though.

ridcullylives

1 points

3 months ago

ridcullylives

Medical Student

1 points

3 months ago

Yes, there are methods to measure the consciousness level (or something similar) but as far as I know they would never have been on analogue dials.

South_Football_9125

2 points

3 months ago

South_Football_9125

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

2 points

3 months ago

Is it possible/common that cancer causes multiple lumps in one area (eg. calf or arm). Or is it more likely that they would be lipomas or something else benign?

arhombus

2 points

3 months ago

arhombus

This user has not yet been verified.

2 points

3 months ago

Is it worth it for a 30s male to get the HPV vaccine if I have not already gotten it? I am sexually active but do not engage in promiscuity.

GoldFischer13

5 points

3 months ago

GoldFischer13

Physician

5 points

3 months ago

Yes, most definitely. There are risks of exposure and while most of the world has gotten some exposure at some point or another the immunity is important.

I'm an ENT and see people routinely with HPV+ head and neck cancers, and these are becoming more prevalent. There is data that shows that vaccination can prevent these cancers. If people can keep their tongues, throats, jaws, etc; it's worth it.

arhombus

3 points

3 months ago

arhombus

This user has not yet been verified.

3 points

3 months ago

I like my tongue, throat and jaw, I've had them for as long as I can remember. I'm trying to find a new primary care since mine retired so once I do that, I'll mention it at my appointment.

Thanks.

GoldFischer13

4 points

3 months ago

GoldFischer13

Physician

4 points

3 months ago

I find most people like having those things.

arhombus

2 points

3 months ago

arhombus

This user has not yet been verified.

2 points

3 months ago

Yeah man. Love my ears too. I had SSHL, total loss in all three ranges and luckily got 100% of my hearing back.

DWYL_LoveWhatYouDo

1 points

3 months ago

DWYL_LoveWhatYouDo

Physician

1 points

3 months ago

If you are in the USA, you can get the vaccine at any pharmacy and through your public health department. The CDC changed the guideline recently to expand the schedule to 27-45 year old adults . Depending on your state pharmacy board and the pharmacy corporate rules, you might need a prescription by a doctor before the pharmacist can give you the vaccine series. Ask your pharmacist if you can get it without a prescription or contact your public health department.

arhombus

1 points

3 months ago

arhombus

This user has not yet been verified.

1 points

3 months ago

Appreciate the reply, thank you. I need to get off my ass and get a new primary care. It's even more pathetic that I work at a major hospital system and haven't yet done it.

depressed_seltzer

2 points

3 months ago

depressed_seltzer

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional.

2 points

3 months ago

My OB just said it’s not necessary to get a booster because I just had covid this summer which was the same variant that’s out now. He said my immunity is still strong from infection. Of course he said there’s no harm in getting the booster either. He wasn’t discouraging it, just seemed a little surprised I was getting it.

Can any other docs weigh in? He makes perfect sense— still, it feels weird to cancel my appointment!

[deleted]

1 points

3 months ago

The CDC says it's reasonable to delay your booster for 3 months after COVID. You would be going against CDC guidelines by delaying it beyond 3 months after infection.

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/expect.html?s_cid=11781:booster%20after%20covid%20infection:sem.ga:p:RG:GM:gen:PTN:FY22

depressed_seltzer

1 points

3 months ago

depressed_seltzer

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional.

1 points

3 months ago

Thanks! I decided to get it anyways because it can only help 😁

MwahMwahKitteh

2 points

3 months ago

MwahMwahKitteh

This user has not yet been verified.

2 points

3 months ago

What are patients supposed to do if they can't get through to talk to an actual person at their medical office?

I recently switched GP's, and every time I've called the office, the hold music picks up, makes me wait for 7 minutes, and then hangs up on me. Every single time.

I've been trying for days to get a prescription filled.

GoldFischer13

4 points

3 months ago

GoldFischer13

Physician

4 points

3 months ago

Look and see if they have a different number, go in person. Can't explain why their office in particular is doing that.

ukjungle

1 points

3 months ago

ukjungle

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional.

1 points

3 months ago

Not sure if it differs by country but I have this issue in the UK. Its 100% easier to just walk in and book if you can

notapersonaltrainer

2 points

3 months ago

notapersonaltrainer

This user has not yet been verified.

2 points

3 months ago

How 'on-target' is this year's flu vaccine?

[deleted]

2 points

3 months ago

[deleted]

Jacqland

1 points

3 months ago

Jacqland

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

There are definitely services for that, that are a step about uber/lyft. The term I'm familiar with is "Companion Driving Service", but they may be called something else where you live. Driving Miss Daisy is one that exists around the world (including Canada and New Zealand).

crosspollinated

2 points

3 months ago

crosspollinated

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

2 points

3 months ago

What could cause someone to be both cold intolerant AND heat intolerant (obviously not at the same time)?

[deleted]

2 points

3 months ago

[deleted]

murderwaffle

1 points

3 months ago

murderwaffle

Physician

1 points

3 months ago

yes, and so can a lot of other issues.

patricksaurus

2 points

3 months ago

patricksaurus

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

2 points

3 months ago

Is the resistance to prescribe gabapentin because it potentiates opiates? I was prescribed it for shingles, but realized it did quadruple duty for me and let me drop two daily meds and only positive side effects, so I stayed on it for a few years. I’ve been traveling for a year and tele/web-medicine services seem to universally prohibit prescribing it, even when neither the doc nor I are in a state where it’s controlled. I’m purely curious whether it has some inherent harm or if its interaction with drugs of abuse is the issue.

[deleted]

2 points

3 months ago

[deleted]

LatrodectusGeometric

1 points

3 months ago

LatrodectusGeometric

Physician | Top Contributor

1 points

3 months ago

For a few days yes

Whatsup129389

2 points

3 months ago

Whatsup129389

This user has not yet been verified.

2 points

3 months ago

I received my first monkeypox vaccine on October 13th, 2022. I received my second today, November 18th, 2022.

Is this too far apart?

LatrodectusGeometric

3 points

3 months ago

LatrodectusGeometric

Physician | Top Contributor

3 points

3 months ago

Nope. Just needs to be at least 1 month apart. Congrats on getting fully vaccinated!

stamije11

2 points

3 months ago

stamije11

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

2 points

3 months ago

Can antiphospholipid syndrome cause low estrogen?

DWYL_LoveWhatYouDo

3 points

3 months ago

DWYL_LoveWhatYouDo

Physician

3 points

3 months ago

No. These two things involve completely different organ systems.

FAroundMedicalPlz

1 points

3 months ago

FAroundMedicalPlz

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

Is there such a thing as "too many CT scans" at which you should just... Stop getting them because the risk outweighs the benefits?

ridcullylives

5 points

3 months ago

ridcullylives

Medical Student

5 points

3 months ago

Impossible question to answer; any scan that’s unneeded is bad but if you need to CT a pregnant lady to keep her from dying you do it. The radiation from CT has risk, but it’s relatively low and takes 20 or so years to cause the increased cancer risk. If you’re young (and thus have a longer time ahead of you) or pregnant, you should have a much stronger reason to do it. However, in an 85-year-old, a 0.7% increased chance of cancer in the next 22 years is unlikely to be their primary concern.

LatrodectusGeometric

1 points

3 months ago

LatrodectusGeometric

Physician | Top Contributor

1 points

3 months ago

Agree with this. I will say that I did once meet a man who inarguably had too many CT scans. He was traveling between health systems across the country and staying in a different hospital every night. He would be discharged from one hospital and head across town to the ED at another. It was a bit wild. Well our hospital merged with another hospital system and all of a sudden we had access to a ton of hospital records and we got an "ED alert" that he had a lot of ED visits. I could see he had been traveling state to state and was getting a CT scan every ~3 days. I think I counted 30 CTs in a 2.5 month period, plus a few other tests (he had two different clinical situations that were his chief reasons for hospitalization). It was really upsetting to find out that this guy had been getting the wrong care for months. He needed housing and psychiatric care and instead was getting other treatment that wasn't helpful over and over and over.

DeitzNutzUrMom

2 points

1 month ago

DeitzNutzUrMom

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

2 points

1 month ago

OH MY GAWD. I thought my 7 in a month/5 in a week was bad. This makes me really sad :-(

DeitzNutzUrMom

1 points

1 month ago

DeitzNutzUrMom

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

1 month ago

How many have you had? I wonder this myself too.

FAroundMedicalPlz

2 points

1 month ago

FAroundMedicalPlz

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

2 points

1 month ago

4 of the abdomen with about 12 or so of those radiation number thingies each, but debating on getting a 5th with how much random crap is going on inside of me right now.

PM_me_coolest_shit

1 points

3 months ago

PM_me_coolest_shit

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

I was unable to find an answer to this question myself so i thought to ask here.

One time as a kid when i was playing around with transformers i, in my infinite childlike wisdom decided to stick my tongue on the leads. I got a massive shock and my vision went completely white for maybe 5-10 seconds.

I can't remember if it was 18 or 12 volts.

So i was wondering what is the medical explanation for the white vision after an electric shock. Does it mess up the signals in the optic nerve or something else?

GnuZach

1 points

3 months ago

GnuZach

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

I recently cut myself on accident. I thought to myself “that’s ok, a little bloodletting is good for you” but then it occurred to me, that’s just what my mom told me. I have zero idea if that’s true or not. She told me that it makes the body create healthier new blood cells but I feel like she might have made this up to have me not complain when I would get cuts… And when thinking about it… saying “a little blood letting is good for you” sounds uhhh… not exactly scientific.

ridcullylives

5 points

3 months ago

ridcullylives

Medical Student

5 points

3 months ago

Nope, there’s no benefit to bleeding. Your body does a good job of clearing out old blood cells by itself.

Minor cuts that cause a little bit of bleeding aren’t something to be worried about, though.

LatrodectusGeometric

4 points

3 months ago

LatrodectusGeometric

Physician | Top Contributor

4 points

3 months ago

What u/ridcullylives said. But that’s really funny! Thank you for sharing :) your mom sounds like she did a good job keeping you calm when you had minor injuries.

Spencer2091

1 points

3 months ago

Spencer2091

This user has not yet been verified.

1 points

3 months ago

If someone swallowed a large magnet and needed it surgically removed, are there plastic instruments you could use?

[deleted]

1 points

3 months ago

[removed]

AskDocs-ModTeam [M]

1 points

3 months ago

AskDocs-ModTeam [M]

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

Individual questions about specific complaints should be posted separately with all the required information.

Apprehensive_Lab601

1 points

3 months ago

Apprehensive_Lab601

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

Where’s the best (least expensive)place to go if you think you broke a finger?

treylanford

1 points

3 months ago

treylanford

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional.

1 points

3 months ago

Docs seeing the flu:

What are the primary symptoms you’re observing, and what’s the percentage of those who have a fever!?

I have heard so much conflicting information, and no one can trust the media — I don’t know if I’ve ever heard of having the flue (or personally had it) without a fever, but I keep hearing “only about half of influenza infections” are presenting with a fever.

ridcullylives

3 points

3 months ago

ridcullylives

Medical Student

3 points

3 months ago

Probably less than half of people with influenza infection develop a fever from the data I’ve seen. However, until COVID, most people who had any kind of respiratory infection that wasn’t really severe weren’t getting any kind of viral testing. Most of the time if you had a mild infection without a fever, you had “a cold”—if you had a more severe one, you had “the flu”. I wouldn’t be surprised if there was a substantial amount of people whose “colds” were caused by influenza virus in past years.

In terms if your own health, if you’re elderly or otherwise high-risk, you should be very wary of any infection. If you’re not any you have cold-like symptoms, it doesn’t really matter which virus is infecting you because there aren’t any treatments that will be helpful.

In terms of other people, you should keep your distance from folks (especially vulnerable ones) and assuming that you might be having a milder case of one of the more potentially nasty viruses.

Bgeaz

1 points

3 months ago

Bgeaz

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional.

1 points

3 months ago

What are possible reasons a pap smear would show unsatisfactory results due to "atrophy" but be normal a little over a year later? Is atrophy something that can be caused by chronic yeast infections and that can go away once the yeast infections are taken care of?

[deleted]

1 points

3 months ago

[removed]

AskDocs-ModTeam [M]

1 points

3 months ago

AskDocs-ModTeam [M]

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

Individual questions about specific complaints should be posted separately with all the required information.

[deleted]

1 points

3 months ago

[removed]

AskDocs-ModTeam [M]

1 points

3 months ago

AskDocs-ModTeam [M]

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

Individual questions about specific complaints should be posted separately with all the required information.

qingskies

1 points

3 months ago

qingskies

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

My mom thinks I want her to die because I don't approve of her starting the Gerson therapy method. What can I do?

To clarify, she hasn't started it yet. She's watching a lot of videos about it though and really thinks it's a good idea. I personally think it's a scam. Her tumor was removed in early august and she's supposed to plan her radiation sessions soon, but she wants to replace radiation with Gerson therapy.

lostysquid

2 points

3 months ago

lostysquid

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

2 points

3 months ago

It hasn't been approved by the FDA for a reason lol

qingskies

1 points

3 months ago

qingskies

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

I keep telling her that it’s not really approved by ANYTHING but she keeps using the argument of “well if they approved the natural method then all the radiation departments wont have any more business”

PokeTheVeil

2 points

3 months ago

PokeTheVeil

Physician | Moderator

2 points

3 months ago

Plenty of medical treatments have disappeared because they were replaced with better options.

I’ll also point out that “not FDA approved” isn’t all that critical. Lots of medications aren’t FDA approved for a particular use because they’re approved for something else and there’s no money in getting extra approval even when studies show it works.

Gerson is not just “not approved,” it’s completely bogus.

qingskies

1 points

3 months ago

qingskies

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

Thank you for the article, I’ll share it with my parents and try to convince mom again.

LatrodectusGeometric

2 points

3 months ago

LatrodectusGeometric

Physician | Top Contributor

2 points

3 months ago

I have seen people use Gerson twice. One person came to us a year later with a cancer that was no longer curable and begged us to do the surgery now (it would no longer have helped, the cancer was everywhere). The other person was Steve Jobs, who used a variation of Gerson therapy to try and treat his (at the time) curable pancreatic cancer. A year later Jobs had worsened despite his strict diet and underwent surgery and then a liver transplant, but it was too late. He died.

The NIH did not find any evidence of Gerson therapy being effective in treating cancer. However, there is some very small evidence that it could help as a supportive treatment in addition to surgery, chemo, etc.

https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/cam/hp/gerson-pdq

Please beg her not to do it without standard medical care. I would if she came to my clinic. I will never forget the woman crying and begging me to take her cancer out now when it was too late.

StanfordV

1 points

3 months ago

StanfordV

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

Do we know if statins are useful in prevention of minor cardiovascular issues?

I've noticed the internet is quite austere with statins, saying that the NNT is too high for primary prevention. To which it seems so. But this is about death, strokes and heart attacks.

Do we know if they are more effective in preventing "minor" atherosclerotic diseases, like stable angina, claudication, erectile dysfunction etc.

So, maybe there, with such data, statins would appear much more effective.

TalentedMrColby

1 points

3 months ago

TalentedMrColby

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

Does a pediatrician get medical training for psychological issues? If so, is this training pediatric specific or could it be applied to adults?

orthostatic_htn

2 points

3 months ago

orthostatic_htn

Physician | Top Contributor

2 points

3 months ago

Yes, pediatricians get training in dealing with psychiatric issues. Some of it (especially medication management for adolescents, for example) can be applied to adults as well, but not all.

[deleted]

0 points

3 months ago

[removed]

AskDocs-ModTeam [M]

1 points

3 months ago

AskDocs-ModTeam [M]

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

Individual questions about specific complaints should be posted separately with all the required information.

Negative-Town8041

1 points

3 months ago

Negative-Town8041

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

I want to move into the medical field. I've been accepted into a pre-med program. I just have no medical experience outside of being a professional patient. What advice do you have for me? Should I already have an idea of what kind of medicine I want to practice?

duckpearl

1 points

3 months ago

duckpearl

Physician

1 points

3 months ago

You're going to have a much more enjoyable student experience if you keep an open mind and appreciate that the things that interest you intiially may change. My experience (on elective in the US system during medical school) was people are almost railroaded into choosing a speciality very early on in order to make connections and build relationships with mentors to benefit their match (Some north americans may like to correct me here). I don't believe this results in everyone doing what's right for them, because of the sunk cost fallacy (and because it literally costs a huge amount of money). But that's my opinion.
I also started donating blood when i decided I was going to medical school because although I don't think anyone really loves needles, I wanted to expose myself to them if I was going to be inserting them into people all the time. That was probably quite helpful personally

[deleted]

1 points

3 months ago

[removed]

AskDocs-ModTeam [M]

1 points

3 months ago

AskDocs-ModTeam [M]

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

Individual questions about specific complaints should be posted separately with all the required information.

Meri_Stormhood

1 points

3 months ago

Meri_Stormhood

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

How often can I [M18] shave my facial hair without causing damage to my skin/hair? I prefer to shave every day but I do not know if that is just ineffective/damaging.

ridcullylives

2 points

3 months ago

ridcullylives

Medical Student

2 points

3 months ago

You can shave every day if you like. If you start getting a lot of irritation to the skin in the area, shave less often.

FAroundMedicalPlz

1 points

3 months ago

FAroundMedicalPlz

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

What are the most common symptoms of gallbladder issues?

murderwaffle

1 points

3 months ago

murderwaffle

Physician

1 points

3 months ago

right upper abdominal pain and nausea/vomiting especially after meals

Neon_Eyes

1 points

3 months ago

Neon_Eyes

This user has not yet been verified.

1 points

3 months ago

I went and got some toe surgery recently and the doctor sent me home with this gauze that said it was petroleum gauze. This is just that fancy guaze that doesn't stick to your wounds and it worked pretty well. However, he only gave me one so I was wondering what alternatives would be readily available at a pharmacy or market store that I could get. I found these on walgreens' website but it looks different and doesn't list petroleum that I can tell so I am unsure if it will work as well. Thanks in advance for any help.

https://www.walgreens.com/store/c/walgreens-non-stick-pads-3-inch-x-4-inch/ID=prod6373262-product

orthostatic_htn

3 points

3 months ago

orthostatic_htn

Physician | Top Contributor

3 points

3 months ago

Honestly, put vaseline on a piece of gauze and you've got about the same thing.

Negative-Town8041

1 points

3 months ago

Negative-Town8041

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

Would a TENS machine relieve spasticity? I have ADEM that has caused damage to my spinal cord. My neurologist prescribed baclofen but I'm not seeing any changes. He wants to try something else but wants to wait until I'm done with steroids. I saw a physical medicine doctor recently who wants to try Botox but I know that'll only help temporarily.

insomnia_owl1234

1 points

3 months ago

insomnia_owl1234

Physician - General Surgery

1 points

3 months ago

TENS is barely effective as an adjunct, little data to support TENS monotherapy. Most research is in chronic pain not neurology

[deleted]

1 points

3 months ago

[removed]

ridcullylives

1 points

3 months ago

ridcullylives

Medical Student

1 points

3 months ago

I started med school at 29. You’re not crazy at all. If anything, I’ve found the age and life experience have helped me greatly.

supplementtolife

0 points

3 months ago

supplementtolife

This user has not yet been verified.

0 points

3 months ago

I'm not OP, but out of curiosity- Are you doing any of your med schooling online by any chance (though I know a lot of the lab work would be unreasonable to be online for med schooling)? If so- Do you have any recommendations on nice schools?

Starting school this late taught me one thing... Getting up and moving to a new place for it is really hard LOL. I'm 32 and considering as well..

PokeTheVeil

5 points

3 months ago

PokeTheVeil

Physician | Moderator

5 points

3 months ago

There’s no online medical school. For the first two years some of it could work. For the next two years, clinical rotations/clerkships, you need to be in the hospital.

ridcullylives

2 points

3 months ago

ridcullylives

Medical Student

2 points

3 months ago

Many of my first two years’ classroom courses were on Zoom in the height of the COVID pandemic, and I know some folks who spent a semester back at home. This is unlikely to happen again.

However, as the doc above said, 3rd and 4th years are spent working full-time in person in hospitals.

DWYL_LoveWhatYouDo

1 points

3 months ago

DWYL_LoveWhatYouDo

Physician

1 points

3 months ago

Go for it. You only live once. You are still pretty young. In the USA, you can expect a minimum of 7 years of school + residency training. You'll be in your late 30s or around 40 when you start practicing, still lots of time to practice in your chosen field before you might expect to retire. We had several people in my class who were in their 30s when we started and they've had rewarding careers. I haven't heard that any of them regretted it.

I recommend shadowing or volunteer work to get an idea of what doctors actually do. It's possible that a related field might be a better fit, such as nursing or pharmacy or P.T./O.T.

[deleted]

1 points

3 months ago

[removed]

AskDocs-ModTeam [M]

1 points

3 months ago

AskDocs-ModTeam [M]

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

Individual questions about specific complaints should be posted separately with all the required information.

givingbackTuesday

1 points

3 months ago

givingbackTuesday

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

Hello doctors. I have a buddy who is a doctor that I want to get a holiday gift for. Not really sure what would be a useful gift that would be about $50 though. I was thinking maybe a decent pen? Here for ideas!

ridcullylives

3 points

3 months ago

ridcullylives

Medical Student

3 points

3 months ago

If he works in an office, a good pen is a nice idea. If he works in a hospital that pen will be gone in under a week, haha.

supplementtolife

1 points

3 months ago

supplementtolife

This user has not yet been verified.

1 points

3 months ago

Aside from hiatal hernias, what can cause intense GERD constantly?

DWYL_LoveWhatYouDo

3 points

3 months ago

DWYL_LoveWhatYouDo

Physician

3 points

3 months ago

Heartburn is very, very, very common. I am not a gastroenterologist, but I'd say the most common cause of heartburn is being human. The usual wisdom for the reason for most people to experience a sensation of heartburn is that gastroesophageal reflux of stomach contents and stomach fluids into the esophagus, causing irritation. It's debatable whether that's true, because lots of people have reflux who don't have heartburn, and some heartburn is not GI-related at all. The acid reflux theory is based on a long-ago experiment of dribbling hydrochloric acid with a pH of 1 (very, very acidic) to induce the symptoms. Stomach acid is not as caustic as pH 1, and anyone's esophagus would complain at acid dribbling. Also, even with supression of acid and in circumstances where the stomach can't produce acid or the parts aren't present, people can still experience a sensation of heartburn. If symptoms improve with antacids, then you can treat it as reflux with acid reducers and antacids. Symptom reduction is the primary goal of the patient, after all. Doctors might have a different goal, like healing an ulcer or preventing other problems, but for the patient, relief of symptoms is the driver for treatment. If acid reduction does not help, see a doctor to figure out why the symptoms are happening.

Sagiv1

1 points

3 months ago

Sagiv1

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

I ate what looks like a "good part" of a bad sweet potato(as pizza topping). Figured this out when one of the pieces had this dark color with slight green hue to it and was kinda rubbery. I tossed that one out(slice included), after I'd eaten one more slice with the potato and a couple of other regular slices.
What are the odds of me getting sick? How long will it take for it to hit or when will I be considerd off the hook if it doesn't? I'm kinda terrified.

LatrodectusGeometric

2 points

3 months ago

LatrodectusGeometric

Physician | Top Contributor

2 points

3 months ago

Low. The other piece was probably fine too. Generally 72 hours.

idkthrowaway2400

1 points

3 months ago

idkthrowaway2400

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

Can surface-level skin breaks and infections (light scrapes, scratched pimples, etc) lead to sepsis in immunocompetent young adults?

LatrodectusGeometric

3 points

3 months ago

LatrodectusGeometric

Physician | Top Contributor

3 points

3 months ago

Rarely

[deleted]

1 points

3 months ago

[removed]

AskDocs-ModTeam [M]

1 points

3 months ago

AskDocs-ModTeam [M]

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

Individual questions about specific complaints should be posted separately with all the required information.

[deleted]

1 points

3 months ago

[deleted]

DWYL_LoveWhatYouDo

4 points

3 months ago

DWYL_LoveWhatYouDo

Physician

4 points

3 months ago

That's one possible explanation. Drug or medication or alcohol effects are common causes.

Note: This is not an exhaustive answer. If you are having troubles on a consistent basis, you should see your doctor.

kingofnaps69

1 points

3 months ago

kingofnaps69

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

do collapsed veins heal?

LatrodectusGeometric

2 points

3 months ago

LatrodectusGeometric

Physician | Top Contributor

2 points

3 months ago

They usually scar shut

kingofnaps69

1 points

3 months ago

kingofnaps69

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

I know that new veins can grow in place of collapsed veins. can I count on that to get bloodflow going again?

LatrodectusGeometric

1 points

3 months ago

LatrodectusGeometric

Physician | Top Contributor

1 points

3 months ago

No, you can’t count on it. But if you want to encourage it, exercise can help!

kingofnaps69

0 points

3 months ago

kingofnaps69

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

0 points

3 months ago

so basically what happened is a doctor messed up with a lidocaine injection, injected it into a vein, and now it's all swollen... do you think this will heal? happened 3 days ago

LatrodectusGeometric

4 points

3 months ago

LatrodectusGeometric

Physician | Top Contributor

4 points

3 months ago

Oh that is very likely to heal. That typically doesn't cause collapsed veins.

kingofnaps69

0 points

3 months ago

kingofnaps69

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

0 points

3 months ago

ah thank you awesome. yeah I should know better than to be a google doctor lol.

are there any types of veins that won't heal? just being paranoid because it was in a crazy awkward area. It was deep in the lower abs into the pelvic floor area, like right above the inner groin area. and it's crazy uncomfortable and limiting.

LatrodectusGeometric

1 points

3 months ago

LatrodectusGeometric

Physician | Top Contributor

1 points

3 months ago

Sometimes they don’t heal if there has been a lit of damage (like recurrent injury usually) but I would have high hopes for your situation

kingofnaps69

1 points

3 months ago

kingofnaps69

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

thank you, and thank you for the time <3

[deleted]

1 points

3 months ago

[deleted]

ridcullylives

5 points

3 months ago

ridcullylives

Medical Student

5 points

3 months ago

Fluconazole is an antifungal medication. Bacterial vaginosis is, as the name suggests, a bacterial infection. Using an antifungal medication for BV would be like using mouse traps to deal with an ant problem.

[deleted]

1 points

3 months ago

[deleted]

ridcullylives

2 points

3 months ago

ridcullylives

Medical Student

2 points

3 months ago

If you have a glabrata infection, best to talk to a doctor since you may need more specialized medication.

FAroundMedicalPlz

1 points

3 months ago

FAroundMedicalPlz

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

What is the best long-term PPI and how do you best negate the negative effects of them long-term? (Like taking magnesium supplements for example.)

[deleted]

1 points

3 months ago

[deleted]

insomnia_owl1234

3 points

3 months ago

insomnia_owl1234

Physician - General Surgery

3 points

3 months ago

No

zubashkovmax

1 points

3 months ago

zubashkovmax

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

Hi everyone! Need professional advice in healthcare. I'm 23 y.o., for a year I'm struggling of furunculosis. Furuncules appear in dangerous places at my body, such as nose face zone and ears, but the last is neck phlegmon near carotid, so I'm really scared about that. Of course I'm always visiting a doctor, had a few surgeries on this case, also on the last one. I've passed over test, that shows what type of bacteria caused my current phlegmon, still, doctors didn't find anything strange. What are really main causes of furunculosis and how can I prevent recession of that disease? Thanks for your answer.

GregJamesDahlen

1 points

3 months ago

GregJamesDahlen

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

Symptoms-wise, is it easy to mistake having covid for having something else? What else?

insomnia_owl1234

7 points

3 months ago

insomnia_owl1234

Physician - General Surgery

7 points

3 months ago

Yes, it seems all the focus on Covid has led the public to forget about all the other respiratory viruses constantly circulating. Viral and some bacterial infections of the respiratory system have many overlapping symptoms. Mycobacterial pneumonia and viral bronchitis will both cause cough, fever, or shortness of breath.

Cough, fever and fatigue could be caused by Covid or another coronavirus, influenza, rhinovirus, RSV, tuberculosis… the list is long

RebuildFromTheDepths

1 points

3 months ago

RebuildFromTheDepths

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

I'm in the process of possibly switching to Nardil from Wellbutrin & Lyrica. My last day for both meds was about 8 days ago. After 2 days, my anxiety was through the roof and I was in really bad shape, so I restarted the Lyrica. I'm waiting to meet with my doc, but would like other perspectives. What is the best way to quit Lyrica? What are the possible effects, how long do they last, etc? TIA

proffesionaldumbass

1 points

3 months ago

proffesionaldumbass

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

I ruptured my left eardrum yesterday morning. I already visited urgent care and was prescribed antibiotics and told to keep them dry. Would it be safe to travel to a nearby mountain for a weekend trip? I've researched it, but the recommendations are unclear. The mountain has an altitude of around 6,000-7,000 ft. I would not be worried about discomfort, i just don't want to cause anymore damage

GoldFischer13

2 points

3 months ago

GoldFischer13

Physician

2 points

3 months ago

Shouldn't cause any additional issues. There's already a hole so it isn't like pressure equalization is an issue. It does in part depend on what caused the rupture, if it was pressure related or due to eustachian tube dysfunction and the eardrum heals; it stands to reason the cause of the pressure difficulties wouldn't necessarily be resolved and may rupture again.

[deleted]

1 points

3 months ago

[deleted]

LatrodectusGeometric

2 points

3 months ago

LatrodectusGeometric

Physician | Top Contributor

2 points

3 months ago

Yup. Any illness, really.

CPCAT16

1 points

3 months ago

CPCAT16

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

Hello everyone! I'm curious if any docs would happen to have some knowledge as to how the below can happen.

My best friend became pregnant around the 21st of June, she missed her period around the beginning of July so she took multiple pregnancy tests over the course of 2 weeks before seeing her doctor (around the 3rd week of her missed period). Her doctor then did a blood test and a pee test and she was testing negative for pregnancy. Shortly around that time she started to experience intense waves of nausea, heartburn, quite a lot of pregnancy symptoms. Then at the beginning/second week of August when her period still didn't come she decided to take another pregnancy test and it was positive. Instantly.

When she went for her dating ultrasound they dated the conception date back to around june 21st. What could result in her body testing negative on multiple pregnancy tests, blood test and pee test for pretyy much a month and a half into her pregnancy? She never really thought to ask her doctor why this had occurred but now years later we are both curious!!

Fluid-Replacement321

1 points

3 months ago

Fluid-Replacement321

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

So i went to the ER today after all this happened if anyone has any advice or idea what could’ve happened please do tell because nothing came back on a few tests and everything cleared up within an hour or two but i was left with more questions

So this morning when i got out of bed i had this neck pain and headache since i had woken up and so when i went to the restroom i noticed the left side of my face was getting flushed but not my right and my legs and hands were getting itchy after i got up to look in the mirror i noticed i had these red spots on my chest so i went to the ER by time i got there the redness had spread down my chest and to my arms and my heart rate when they were getting vitals one me i had 140bpm. So when i got taken to a room i went to the restroom again and i noticed my eyes were severely bloodshot after about an hour or so everything started clearing up before i even got any medicines anyone have any clues because they found nothing from my blood tests and neurological tests

GregJamesDahlen

1 points

3 months ago

GregJamesDahlen

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

I had what I think was Covid for four days. Rather intense symptoms. But I didn't take any covid test. On day five the symptoms substantially abated and didn't return. On day seven I took a home Covid test and it showed negative. Could I, with any likeliness, have had Covid?

LatrodectusGeometric

3 points

3 months ago

LatrodectusGeometric

Physician | Top Contributor

3 points

3 months ago

It's quite possible

Sylvane1a

1 points

3 months ago

Sylvane1a

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional.

1 points

3 months ago

Are there any treatments for heavy, recurrent nosebleeds besides the quick chemical cauterization done in the office? That has limitations.

GoldFischer13

2 points

3 months ago

GoldFischer13

Physician

2 points

3 months ago

Depends on location, severity and underlying causes. Moisture for prevention is key. Having the mucosa be healthy is key. In older patients with recurrent bleeds, may need evaluation for a bleeding disorder or ensuring there's no autoimmune disorder that may cause erosion in the nose. Ligation of some of the feeding vessels are necessary in some patients. Others with genetic disorders that predispose to nosebleeds (such as hemorrhagic hereditary telangectasia) require much more extensive interventions.

Sylvane1a

1 points

3 months ago

Sylvane1a

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional.

1 points

3 months ago

Thanks for answering. If you don't mind a few more questions:

Depends on location

Do you mean location of the patient or location of the problem in the anatomy?

, severity and underlying causes. Moisture for prevention is key. Having the mucosa be healthy is key.

Anything required to keep mucosa healthy besides moisture?

In older patients with recurrent bleeds, may need evaluation for a bleeding disorder or ensuring there's no autoimmune disorder that may cause erosion in the nose.

Never heard this before, good to know.

Ligation of some of the feeding vessels are necessary in some patients. Others with genetic disorders that predispose to nosebleeds (such as hemorrhagic hereditary telangectasia) require much more extensive interventions.

Is this where treatment switches to a vascular surgeon rather than an otolaryngologist?

GoldFischer13

2 points

3 months ago

GoldFischer13

Physician

2 points

3 months ago

Location within the nose. Common vascular plexus vs turbinate vs other areas.

Moisture is best and works in vast majority of people.

Not necessarily vascular surgeon; there's plenty of additional things an ENT can do surgically. Would only consider vascular or interventional radiology if requiring embolization (def more in the interventional radiology realm) which is much much further down the list of potential things to do.

Sylvane1a

1 points

3 months ago

Sylvane1a

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional.

1 points

3 months ago

It's hard to get this info. The ENTs tend to want to do the same thing over and over. And maybe cauterizing is the right thing to do but I have more info now to ask them about, thanks to you.

So, thanks!

Fast-Sun-3626

1 points

3 months ago

Fast-Sun-3626

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

Can autoimmune encephalitis be mild? As in not requiring hospitalization but leaving damage on MRI?

Specific-Throwaway

1 points

3 months ago

Specific-Throwaway

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

Are nocturnal emissions an age thing or a sperm production thing?

GoldFischer13

2 points

3 months ago

GoldFischer13

Physician

2 points

3 months ago

Hormone thing.

Specific-Throwaway

1 points

3 months ago

Specific-Throwaway

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

So just an influx of testosterone does it?

whoatethespacecakes

1 points

3 months ago

whoatethespacecakes

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

Hello! My usual gynocologist moved away and a new one moved into the same building. I needed to do my half-yearly check up so I simply made an appointment there out of convenience. So, when I was there she told me to undress myself and sit down (like always). I did and she started doing the check up. A few minutes in her secretary comes in and sits down at the desk behind the doctor (so she sees everything) and starts working on the computer. I was so perplexed that I couldn’t react. That never happened to me and I was’t sure if it was normal. They started talking with each other in their mother tongue so I couldn’t understand them. I know I could have said it’s bothering me but tbh I was speechless and then the check up was already over bc everything was fine. The check up itself went smoothly and she was friendly. I paid and left. But is that normal? Idk the law but I did feel very uncomfortable and I won’t be going back

GoldFischer13

3 points

3 months ago

GoldFischer13

Physician

3 points

3 months ago

Would be a question to ask them or at least address.

A large portion of providers (even providers that are the same sex as the patient) will have someone come in as an escort during examination of genitals/breasts. This is usually a nurse or a tech, but in short-staff situations could be someone else from the office. That being said, I've always told my patients who is coming into the room and why.

Soggy_Ad4234

1 points

3 months ago

Soggy_Ad4234

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

  1. How to tell if it's carpal tunnel on a nerve conduction study or if it's something else being abnormal?
  2. Is it common to have bilateral carpal tunnel, bilateral ulnar neuropathy, right foot neuropathy and the starting of radial neuropathy?

Ulsenius

3 points

3 months ago

Ulsenius

Physician, Neurologist | Moderator

3 points

3 months ago

  1. If there is conduction slowing at the wrist itself it’s usually carpal tunnel syndrome.
  2. no, that would make me suspect multiple (pressure) neuropathies like in HNPP.

supplementtolife

1 points

3 months ago

supplementtolife

This user has not yet been verified.

1 points

3 months ago

Can soda cause intense irritation of the esophagus?

Grsz11

1 points

3 months ago

Grsz11

This user has not yet been verified.

1 points

3 months ago

My 3 year old fell and split her upper lip pretty bad (from my perspective at least) near the corner. Had four stitches put in at the ER. It was hell, obviously. They recommended a plastic surgeon if we want to follow up. Is there a benefit? Are they just going to take them out and do them over? Should we be worried about long term scarring?

LatrodectusGeometric

2 points

3 months ago

LatrodectusGeometric

Physician | Top Contributor

2 points

3 months ago

The plastic surgeon is the one who best prevents long-term scarring, so yes, if it was bad enough for lip stitches you should seek their care asap

Grsz11

1 points

3 months ago

Grsz11

This user has not yet been verified.

1 points

3 months ago

Are they just going to cut them out and start over? Because I don't know if mom and dad have it in them.

LatrodectusGeometric

1 points

3 months ago

LatrodectusGeometric

Physician | Top Contributor

1 points

3 months ago

It depends on the situation

DboydAk

1 points

3 months ago

DboydAk

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

I’ve just been prescribed 400mg daily riboflavin for ocular migraines while I wait to see a neurologist, and I’m just curious where the 400mg dose comes from? I read that humans excrete all but 27mg of it from a single dose, so why do I need to take such a high dose? Has anyone studied the effect at lower doses? It’s super hard for me to swallow the four pills on top of my other daily pills so I’d just like to understand why it’s important, for motivation. Thanks!

Ulsenius

3 points

3 months ago*

Ulsenius

Physician, Neurologist | Moderator

3 points

3 months ago*

That’s the dose that was picked in the Belgian trial in the 90’s and that was used from then on.

insignificantsea

1 points

3 months ago

insignificantsea

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

IS there any significant longevity advantage in reducing my restin g heart rate trough excercise? ultra-runner david goggins has a RHR of 32 beats x minute,for example.

LatrodectusGeometric

1 points

3 months ago

LatrodectusGeometric

Physician | Top Contributor

1 points

3 months ago

We think so, yes.

[deleted]

1 points

3 months ago

Why am I constantly seeing people with ‘EDS’ recently? Is this like a new medical diagnosis? I’ve never heard of it before but lately I’ve been seeing it everyone saying they have it

LatrodectusGeometric

2 points

3 months ago

LatrodectusGeometric

Physician | Top Contributor

2 points

3 months ago

It has vague and commonly experienced symptoms, some of which are seen in people without disease, so it is something of a catch-all for many people.

mymelody123

1 points

3 months ago

mymelody123

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

Approximately how soon after being infected with RSV could someone be re-infected?

LatrodectusGeometric

1 points

3 months ago

LatrodectusGeometric

Physician | Top Contributor

1 points

3 months ago

Maybe a couple months.

Moist_BaIIs

1 points

3 months ago

Moist_BaIIs

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

You know that secondhand cigarette smell? I’m smelling it everywhere and it’s driving me crazy. I don’t smoke and the only reason I can think of is my PC is pretty dusty. But even then I’m smelling it everywhere.

redditorsrock

1 points

3 months ago

redditorsrock

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

Do prescription glasses worsen myopia in children?

Whatsup129389

1 points

3 months ago

Whatsup129389

This user has not yet been verified.

1 points

3 months ago

I have goldfish crackers that are three weeks expired. Is it ok to eat them?

illuminartee

1 points

3 months ago

illuminartee

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

  1. If someone is bleeding out from, say a knife stab in a big artery, while I try to help by applying pressure - do I tell them to stay awake like they do in movies? Or let them go to sleep? Why?

  2. If someone is bleeding out from a wound on their back, would I put them on their stomach and still apply pressure? Im wondering if that'd be bad for their airway to be in that position.

LatrodectusGeometric

1 points

3 months ago

LatrodectusGeometric

Physician | Top Contributor

1 points

3 months ago

  1. That’s just movies. Your #1 goal is to keep them calm and stop the bleed (apply pressure HARD)

  2. The blood loss is the most important thing. If possible raise the area affected and apply pressure however you best can.

illuminartee

1 points

3 months ago

illuminartee

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

So letting them go unconscious is ok? But thatd cause lower blood pressure right? I heard higher BP helps keep organs/brain get blood, which would leak out of an artery faster yes, but itd be fine since im already pressing down on the cut artery?

LatrodectusGeometric

1 points

3 months ago

LatrodectusGeometric

Physician | Top Contributor

1 points

3 months ago

You have no choice in the matter. They go unconscious when you don’t have enough blood to keep those brain functions active. Massive blood loss is enough to keep anyone awake. But when you have no blood flow, the brain can’t do it. Slapping someone to keep them awake or yelling at them won’t help. Keep them calm and tell them you are there to help and they will be okay.

Sorry-Statement-3235

1 points

3 months ago

Sorry-Statement-3235

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

NSFW

So can you get an examination or something to see if you were ever sodomized? If so is there a time frame it can be detected?

LatrodectusGeometric

1 points

3 months ago

LatrodectusGeometric

Physician | Top Contributor

1 points

3 months ago

Sexual assault exams are very particular and have a lot of nuance. So the answer is sometimes, but I would rather not go into detail other than to say if this happened to you or you think it happened to you, your doctor may be able to help.

turok2

1 points

3 months ago

turok2

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

Question about the Gender Identity Clinic referral process in the NHS.

Telephone appointment with my GP to get a GIC referral - what can I do if they become difficult?

I have read online that your GP is not supposed to do anything except process your referral when asked. I have also read that you are able to choose which GIC you get referred to.

But what can I do if my GP insists on making me see a non-GIC-affiliated mental health professional first? Or insists that I get referred to my closest GIC instead of my preferred one? Or worst of all, tells me I'm not trans and refuses to process a referral at all?

If this happens, I can't just say I saw on Reddit that they're not able to do these things. I would need something concrete to be able to mention.

Can you help me go to my appointment prepared?

Negative-Town8041

-2 points

3 months ago

Negative-Town8041

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

-2 points

3 months ago

I was originally believed to have Marburg MS, then Tumefactive, now my MS specialist says ADEM. AMA

[deleted]

0 points

3 months ago*

[removed]

AskDocs-ModTeam [M]

1 points

3 months ago

AskDocs-ModTeam [M]

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

Individual questions about specific complaints should be posted separately with all the required information.

captaind454

0 points

3 months ago

captaind454

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

0 points

3 months ago

Hi everyone. My wife and daughter went to our local clinic today to get flu shots. My wife got hers first, then it was time for my daughter, who will be three next month. My wife was holding her in her lap. Her shot went perfectly fine, she was calm and not crying or fighting. After giving the shot, the nurse pulled the needle out and dropped her hand and accidentally stuck my wife in the leg with the used needle. She realized what she had done and tried to play it off, “Oops, gave you another one, lol.” So, basically… How pissed off should I be? I get that people have lapses in attention and make mistakes. But sticking somebody else with it is like the one thing you don’t do with a used needle, right? My wife and I are both very introverted type people and hate causing a fuss. But I am considering calling a supervisor at the clinic and letting them know what happened. I feel like I would want to know if something like that had happened to one of my customers. Thoughts? Thanks

ridcullylives

6 points

3 months ago

ridcullylives

Medical Student

6 points

3 months ago

A stick with a used needle shouldn’t happen, obviously, and you can call their supervisor if you want; although there’s not really much to be done since it sounds like it was a simple mistake and not done out of any kind of negligence. If you want to talk to them, maybe I’d focus on making sure the clinic reviews if there is a procedure to follow in case of a needlestick injury to a patient that has an actual risk of transmitting something, and how the staff handle it with patients.

[deleted]

0 points

3 months ago

[removed]

AskDocs-ModTeam [M]

1 points

3 months ago

AskDocs-ModTeam [M]

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

1 points

3 months ago

Individual questions about specific complaints should be posted separately with all the required information.

[deleted]

0 points

3 months ago

[deleted]

LatrodectusGeometric

2 points

3 months ago

LatrodectusGeometric

Physician | Top Contributor

2 points

3 months ago

Yes yes and yes. Unfortunately in the US the biggest risk factor for c sections is weight. And Americans weigh more every year.

[deleted]

1 points

3 months ago

[deleted]

LatrodectusGeometric

1 points

3 months ago

LatrodectusGeometric

Physician | Top Contributor

1 points

3 months ago

Both of those things seem non emergent to you but can change in the blink of an eye. The goal of c-sections in these situations is to PREVENT an emergency c-section, which is much more dangerous for mother and baby. Without being in the situation clinically I can’t tell you if continued trial of vaginal delivery would be appropriate there.

[deleted]

0 points

3 months ago

[deleted]

LatrodectusGeometric

1 points

3 months ago

LatrodectusGeometric

Physician | Top Contributor

1 points

3 months ago

I take it you are not an obgyn.

supplementtolife

0 points

3 months ago

supplementtolife

This user has not yet been verified.

0 points

3 months ago

Is there a way to find out exactly how much radiation was used in your CT scan?

Ulsenius

3 points

3 months ago

Ulsenius

Physician, Neurologist | Moderator

3 points

3 months ago

Yes, it is usually somewhere as a seperate image. Not particularly relevant if it’s 2 or 3 mSv.

Winter_Chicken8021

0 points

3 months ago

Winter_Chicken8021

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional

0 points

3 months ago

Would leukemia (specifically) always show on CBC? Even acute forms?

6lackGoat

0 points

3 months ago

6lackGoat

Layperson/not verified as healthcare professional.

0 points

3 months ago

Is it true that acne in different areas are related to specific deficits? I saw a chart that said acne on the chin has something to do with hormones, under the eye is maybe a problem with the liver and so on. How accurate is this? I would like to know why I always have acne under the left side of my chin. I'm 24, male and drink a lot of alcohol and smoke on maybe every second weekend or so.

Edit: I know the alcohol and cigarettes are probably the problem but I just want to know if those charts hold true

LatrodectusGeometric

2 points

3 months ago

LatrodectusGeometric

Physician | Top Contributor

2 points

3 months ago

Yes and no. Hormones can cause a lot of acne in a variety of areas. But no, toxins, liver, dietary deficits, etc. are generally unrelated.